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Thursday, July 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of relation of the Eudemian to the Nicomachean ethics of Aristotle. found in the catalog.

relation of the Eudemian to the Nicomachean ethics of Aristotle.

Mary Craig Needler

relation of the Eudemian to the Nicomachean ethics of Aristotle.

by Mary Craig Needler

  • 23 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published in Chicago .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aristotle -- Ethics.,
  • Ethics, Ancient.

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB491.E7 N4
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 174 l.
    Number of Pages174
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4585898M
    LC Control Number77210751

    The Aristotelian Ethics A Study of the Relationship between the Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle. Second Edition. Anthony Kenny. New edition of a ground breaking work; Offers a re-evaluation of Aristotle's ethical works; Minor revisions throughout the original text with 60 pages of new, previously unpublished, material. While most attention has traditionally focused on Aristotle’s famous Nicomachean Ethics, the Eudemian Ethics, Related ISBN MARC Record Download. OCLC Pages Launched on MUSE Language.

    Get this from a library! The Aristotelian ethics: a study of the relationship between the Eudemian and Nicomachean ethics of Aristotle. [Anthony Kenny]. In The Eudemian Ethics, Aristotle explores the factors that make life worth living. He considers the role of happiness, and what happiness consists of, and he analyzes various aspects that contribute to it: human agency, the relation between action and virtue, and the concept of virtue itself.

    The Eudemian Ethics discusses a range of topics rather similar to that of the Nicomachean Ethics, and it proceeds in a rather similar order: beginning with a discussion of happiness as the highest humanly achievable good, and a conception of it as active exercise of virtue, Aristotle then offers theories of character-virtues like courage and. Terence Irwin’s edition of the Nicomachean Ethics offers more aids to the reader than are found in any modern English translation. It includes an Introduction, headings to help the reader follow the argument, explanatory notes on difficult or important passages, and a full glossary explaining Aristotle.


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Relation of the Eudemian to the Nicomachean ethics of Aristotle by Mary Craig Needler Download PDF EPUB FB2

Appendix 1 The Relationship between the Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics; Appendix 2 Nicomachean Ethics 1. 7, a 15– a 20 (Translation) Appendix 3 Eudemian Ethics VIII. 2 (= VII. 14) (Greek Text) Appendix 4 Eudemian Ethics VIII. Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

“Aristotle’s Poetics in Relation to the Ethical Treatises.” – in Wians ed. Fritzsche, The Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics: Cited by: 1. Sir Anthony Kenny presents a second edition of his landmark work The Aristotelian Ethics, which transformed Aristotle studies in by showing, on stylistic, historical, and philosophical grounds, that the Eudemian Ethics was a mature work with as strong a claim to be Aristotle's ethical masterpiece as the more widely studied Nicomachean Ethics.5/5(1).

In the Nicomachean Ethics it is limited to Practical Wisdom, prudentia, 'prudence,' as distinct from θεωρία, sapientia, 'speculative wisdom.' 5 It must always be remembered that the Greek term is less limited in meaning than 'virtue,' and may denote excellence in any department, not only moral goodness.

Books V, VI, and VII of the Nicomachean Ethics are identical to Books IV, V, and VI of the Eudemian Ethics. Opinions about the relationship between the two works, for example which was written first, and which originally contained the three common books, is divided.

Book description. Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics has been unjustly neglected in comparison with its more famous counterpart the Nicomachean Ethics. This is in large part due to the fact that until recently no complete translation of the work has been available.

It has long been recognized that anyone seriously interested in Aristotle's moral philosophy will need to take full account of the Eudemian Ethics, a work still gravely neglected in favor of the better-known Nicomachean Ethics.

The relation between the two continues to. The Eudemian Ethics, sometimes abbreviated EE in scholarly works, is a work of philosophy by Aristotle. Its primary focus is on ethics, making it one of the primary sources available for study of Aristotelian ethics.

It is named for Eudemus of Rhodes, a pupil of Aristotle who may also have had a hand in editing the final work. It is commonly believed to have been written before the Nicomachean Ethics, although.

Anyone seriously interested in Aristotle's moral philosophy must take full account of the Eudemian Ethics, a work which has in the past been unduly neglected in favour of the better-known Nicomachean Ethics. The relation between the two treatises is now the subject of lively debate.

The Eudemian Ethics is a major treatise on moral philosophy whose central concern is what makes life worth living. Aristotle considers the role of happiness, and what happiness consists of, and he analyses various factors that contribute to it: human agency, the relation between action and virtue, and the concept of virtue itself.

A summary of Part X (Section10) in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Nicomachean Ethics and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Sir Anthony Kenny presents a second edition of his landmark work The Aristotelian Ethics, which transformed Aristotle studies in by showing, on stylistic, historical, and philosophical grounds, that the Eudemian Ethics was a mature work with as strong a claim to be Aristotle's ethical masterpiece as the more widely studied Nicomachean Ethics.

Aristotle devotes Book V of the Nicomachean Ethics to justice (this is also Book IV of the Eudemian Ethics). In this discussion, Aristotle defines justice as having two different but related senses—general justice and particular justice.

General justice is virtue expressed in relation to other people. (Throughout this article, references to Ethics or EN are to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics; for the relationship of the Nicomachean Ethics to Aristotle’s other ethical writings, including the Eudemian Ethics (EE), see Relationship between the Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics.) The work inaugurates the study of “ethics” as an independent discipline, albeit a discpline which is broader than modern notions of morality, which is primarily practical.

Books V, VI, and VII of the Nicomachean Ethics are identical to Books IV, V, and VI of the Eudemian Ethics. Opinions about the relationship between the.

The Routledge Guidebook to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics introduces the major themes in Aristotle’s great book and acts as a companion for reading this key work, examining: The context of Aristotle’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in relation to its goals, meanings and impact The reception the book.

Anyone seriously interested in Aristotle's moral philosophy must take full account of the Eudemian Ethics, a work which has in the past been unduly neglected in favor of the better-known Nicomachean Ethics. The relation between the two treatises is now the subject of lively debate. In the past century, with the rise of virtue theory in moral philosophy, Aristotle's ethics has been revived as a source of insight and interest.

While most attention has traditionally focused on Aristotle's famous Nicomachean Ethics, there are several other works written by or attributed to Aristotle that illuminate his ethics: the Eudemian. Eudemian Ethics. son, who fell in battle when a mere lad. Both may have been the compilers of the treatises that bear their names: Cicero (De Finibus v) says that The Nicomachean Ethics, though attributed to Aristotle himself, can well have been by his son, and Diogenes of Laerte quotes from it as by the early commentator Porphyry speaks of both works as ‘dedicated to.

A summary of Part X (Section5) in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Nicomachean Ethics and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Books V, VI, and VII of the Nicomachean Ethics are identical to Books IV, V, and VI of the Eudemian Ethics.

Opinions about the relationship between the two works, for example which was written first, and which originally contained the three common books, is divided.See Aristotle's Ethics: "Aristotle wrote two ethical treatises: the Nicomachean Ethics and the Eudemian Ethics.

The words “Eudemian” and “Nicomachean” were added later, perhaps because the former was edited by his friend, Eudemus, and the latter by his son, Nicomachus.This book is an attempt to solve a long-standing problem of Aristotelian scholarship on the basis of historical and philosophical arguments and a statistical study of features of style.

It presents a detailed study of the relationship between the Eudemian and Nichomachean Ethics of Aristotle. The book provides a synthesis of three disciplines: philosophy, classical studies, and statistics.